COOKING TECHNIQUES

 
DSC_6305.jpg

BOILING / ต้ม

In the past, handmade, thick earthenware pots filled with liquid were set over hot coals, a lid was placed on top to bring the liquid to the boil faster. In the past, Thais used to use rainwater collected in large earthenware urns as well as water collected from the river as a base for their soups. There is a belief that when boiling seafood and meats, allow the liquid to come to a vigorous boil before adding it to the pot and wait until fish or meat to be fully cooked, before stirring it.

 
Screen Shot 2018-04-29 at 4.29.17 PM.png

BRAISE / ตุ๋น

Slowly cooking to tenderize tougher cuts of meats, vegetables are often added and fat is skimmed off as it rises to the top. Items can be braised in a pot on a very low heat or alternatively can be steamed in bowls with liquid added for a long period of time. This technique is used mostly with chinese influenced Thai dishes, resulting in a well rounded rich flavour with a minimal amount of intensely flavoured liquid left over.

 
DSC_5347.jpg

QUICK SIMMER / รวน

A very small amount of water and a touch of salt is added to a pot. Meats  are cooked over a medium heat while stirring, this cooks the item very quickly and keeps it moist without the addition of any oil. As a result the meat retains its natural flavours and cooks quickly. This technique is widely used for meats that goes into a salad. In the rustic larb of minced meat the left over liquid is used as a base for the dressing of the salad.

 
Screen Shot 2018-04-29 at 4.29.17 PM.png

BLANCH / ลวก

A large pot of boiling salted water is brought to the boil, ingredients are added to the pot. As soon as the water comes back to the boil, the ingredients are removed with a slotted spoon or a spider made from brass. It is quickly plunged into cold water to stop the cooking process. This technique is often used with vegetables that will accompany a relish, retaining the flavour, structure and colour of the vegetables.

 
DSC_3955.jpg

STEAM / นึ่ง

Steam cooks an item delicately, it is the technique used to cook glutinous rice in bamboo baskets placed over simmering water in earthenware pots. Later on, the chinese introduced brass  and copper steamers. To stop items sticking to the steamer banana leaves are torn up and laid down, it also adds fragrance and regulates the amount of steam rising through the holes. Steaming also features in the production of desserts and snacks.

 
DSC_2392.jpg

DEEP FRY / ทอด . เจียว

Rendered pork fat or coconut oil was used in the past to impart a wonderful fragrance and depth of flavour to deep fried dishes, however nowadays vegetable oil is widely used. In Thailand, most deep frying is done in woks with the aid of a brass spider or a large pair of chopsticks, these tools tells a story of the chinese origin this cooking technique. Reserve leftover oil from deep frying garlic or shallots to add fragrance to various dishes.

 
Screen Shot 2018-04-29 at 4.29.17 PM.png

STIR FRY / ผัด

Traditional Thai stir fries were cooked slowly in earthenware woks at a medium heat. Very hot stir fries were influenced by the Chinese, which imparts the breath of smokiness to the dish. The metal wok and gas burners also gave birth to Thai fast food, allowing dishes to be made to order in a few minutes. Although some still use hot coals for their even heat distribution and the wonderful fragrance it imparts on the food.

 
Screen Shot 2018-04-29 at 4.29.17 PM.png

TOAST / ขั้ว

A dry pan is heated and ingredients are tossed over low heat to slowly and evenly toast the item, bringing out its aromatic oils. This technique can be used to invigorate whole dry spices before pounding into a curry paste. Raw glutinous rice grains are toasted and lightly ground in a pestle and mortar. It is then added to the jaew dipping sauce imparting a nutty, roasted note and also adding crunch

 
DSC_5336.jpg

GRILL / ปิ้ง . ย่าง

One of the most primitive ways of cooking food is over hot coals. Meats and fish are skewered and left over the hot embers to grill slowly. The coals imparts smoky characteristics and a deep mahogany colour. Nowadays, wire racks are placed over portable coal burners. A fan is used to increase the heat and ash is sprinkled on the coals when the heat needs to be lowered. The meat is flipped over frequently to stop it from burning.

 
DSC_3368.jpg

CHAR GRILL / เผา

Ingredients such as, whole garlic, chilies and shallots are sometimes skewered and placed close to the coals, charring the exterior. The blackened skin is usually removed to reveal a wonderfully, sweet, moist interior. This technique is used in the north as the char grilled items lose their pungently and becomes less intense, it is then added to mild relishes and pounded into a  number of rustic curry pastes.

 
DSC_6232.jpg

BAKE / อบ

Ingredients such as, whole garlic, chilies and shallots are sometimes skewered and placed close to the coals, charring the exterior. The blackened skin is usually removed to reveal a wonderfully, sweet, moist interior. This technique is used in the north as the char grilled items lose their pungently and becomes less intense, it is then added to mild relishes and pounded into a  number of rustic curry pastes.